Monday, June 13, 2016

Come visit the Indian Residential Schools & Metis Heritage displays in the Library!

The Library has created two displays to celebrate Aboriginal Awareness Month at the college. Please come by and check them out!


  • Indian Residential Schools - located on the 2nd floor of the Library near the entrance (Read more about this display below)
  • Inuit Heritage & Culture - located on the 2nd floor of the Library near the printers
  • Metis Heritage & Culture - located on the 1st floor of the Library near the stairs


Journey to Reconciliation



From 1831 to 1969, the Government of Canada and Roman Catholic, Anglican, Methodist, and Presbyterian Churches operated over 139 Indian Residential Schools (IRS). Approximately 150,000 First Nations, Inuit, and M├ętis children were separated from their families and communities (AANDC, 2015). Conditions in these schools were substandard, with children frequently punished for practicing their cultural traditions, including speaking their native languages (TRC, 2015a). According to the Chair of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), Justice Murray Sinclair, the Indian Residential School System (IRSS) was part of “a larger effort by Canadian authorities to force Indigenous peoples to assimilate...Removed from their families and home communities, seven generations of Aboriginal children were denied their identity through a systematic and concerted effort to extinguish their culture, language, and spirit” (2015, p. vii). Although the majority of IRS were closed by the mid-1970s, the impacts continue in the form of “significant educational, income, and health disparities between Aboriginal people and other Canadians” (TRC, 2015a, p. 3). The unresolved trauma of survivors who experienced or witnessed physical, emotional, and sexual abuse has had profound intergenerational effects, contributing to family breakdown, addiction and mental illness, violence, and poverty (Dolha, 2009).


Over the past several years, there have been significant contributions made towards healing and reconciliation. The most prominent has been the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), which spent six years travelling across the country to gather documents and testimony from over 6500 Survivors. The TRC published 10 Principles for Reconciliation between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal Canadians, which includes an emphasis on education: “Reconciliation requires sustained public education and dialogue, including youth engagement, about the history and legacy of residential schools, Treaties, and Aboriginal rights, as well as the historical and contemporary contributions of Aboriginal peoples to Canadian society” (2015b, pp. 3-4).


In support of this principle, this display aims to build public awareness of the history and legacy of the IRSS. The chronology details both broad political events and specific historical developments, with a focus on Alberta. It integrates archival images, reports, and timelines from by the TRC, National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation (NCTR), Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada (AANDC), Aboriginal Healing Foundation (AHF), and Legacy of Hope Foundation (LHF).

References
Aboriginal Affairs and Northern Development Canada. (2016). Indian residential schools. Retrieved from https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/ 
Alberta Healing Foundation. (n.d.). A condensed timeline of events. Retrieved from http://www.ahf.ca/
Anglican Church of Canada. (2008, September 23). The Mohawk Institute — Brantford, ON. Retrieved from http://www.anglican.ca/tr/histories/mohawk-institute/
Blue Quills First Nations University. (n.d.). About us. Retrieved from http://www.bluequills.ca/welcome/about-us/
Bryce, H.P. (1907/1922). The story of a national crime: being an appeal for justice to the Indians of Canada ; the wards of the nation, our allies in the Revolutionary War, our brothers-in-arms in the Great War. Retrieved from http://projectofheart.ca/historical-documents/
Cardinal, H. (1999). The unjust society. Vancouver, Canada: Douglas & McIntyre
Davin, N.F. (1879, March 14). Report on Industrial Schools for Indians and Half-breeds. Retrieved from http://www.canadianshakespeares.ca/multimedia/pdf/davin_report.pdf
Dolha, L. (2009, March 24). The Sixties Scoop: How Canada’s “best intentions” proved catastrophic. First Nations Drum. Retrieved from http://www.firstnationsdrum.com/
Edmond, J. (2014, July). Indian residential schools: A chronology. Law Now. Retrieved from http://www.lawnow.org/indian-residential-schools-chronology/
Idle No More. (n.d.). The vision. Retrieved from http://www.idlenomore.ca/vision
Legacy of Hope Foundation. (2011). 100 years of loss – The residential school system in Canada. Retrieved from http://100yearsofloss.ca/
Neeganagwedgin, E. (2014). ‘They can’t take our ancestors out of us’: A brief historical account of Canada’s residential school system, incarceration, institutionalized policies and legislations against indigenous peoples. Canadian Issues, Spring, 31-36. Retrieved from http://www.acs-aec.ca/
National Centre for Truth and Reconciliation. (2015). Residential schools timeline. Retrieved from http://nctr.ca/exhibitions.php
Pivot Legal Society. (2008). Broken promises: Parents speak about B.C.’s child welfare system. Retrieved from http://www.pivotlegal.org/
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. (n.d.). Frequently asked questions. Retrieved from http://www.trc.ca/
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. (2015). The final report of the truth and reconciliation commission of Canada, Volume 1 - Canada’s residential schools: The history, 1939 to 2000. Retrieved from http://nctr.ca/reports.php
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. (2015a). The final report of the truth and reconciliation commission of Canada, Volume 5 - Canada’s residential schools: The legacy. Retrieved from http://nctr.ca/reports.php
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. (2015b). What we have learned: Principles of truth and reconciliation. Retrieved from http://nctr.ca/reports.php
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. (2015c). Honouring the truth, reconciling for the future: Summary of the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. Retrieved from http://nctr.ca/reports.php
The Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. (2015d). The survivors speak: A report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada. Retrieved from http://nctr.ca/reports.php
Thomas, J. [Curator]. Where are the children? Healing the legacy of residentials schools. (2001). Retrieved from http://wherearethechildren.ca/

University of British Columbia First Nations and Indigenous Studies (UBC FNIS). (2009). Government policy. Retrieved from http://indigenousfoundations.arts.ubc.ca/home/government-policy.html